2015 “Pride & Pedigree”

Millionaires’ Row • Vallamont • Market Street • East Third Street
Saturday,  November 21st               9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

These photos are copyrighted and property of the photographer.
Please ask permission before using.

Richard Karp    rikkisan.com    570.244.7131

Download the 2015 Brochure here.
Download the 2015 Map here.

The Woodnutt/Wright House
1024 First Avenue

The Woodnutt/Wright House

The Woodnutt/Wright House

Sponsor: Weichert Realtors Premier, Chris Pardee & Marcy Benson
Owners: Demarr and Gina Wright
Chair: Meg Smith
Florist: Nevill’s Flowers, Rosemary Holmes
Theme: Ladies Dogs
This three-story Victorian home was built in 1906 by Charles Woodnutt for his
personal residence. Woodnutt, a building contractor by occupation, also built the
Williamsport Furniture Co. factory. The front of the house originally faced Glenwood
Ave and was later remodeled into a Colonial Revival style with center hallway
facing First Ave. The house currently features exterior stucco walls with third
floor dormers spaced evenly across the roof. The current owners recently remodeled
this multi-unit home back into a single family dwelling.

 

The Humes/Hutchinson Tudor
515 Vallamont Drive

The Humes/Hutchinson Tudor

The Humes/Hutchinson Tudor

Sponsor: Moon & Raven Public House Restaurant
Owners: Gabriel and Rachael Hutchinson
Chair: Nicole Nardi
Florist: Special Occasion Florals, Karen Ruhl
Theme: Nanny Dogs
This elegant frame and stucco Tudor home was built in 1923 by Theodore and
Ethel Miller. Theodore Miller was the president and general manager of the Pompeian
Manufacturing Company which made builder’s supplies around the 1920’s.
Striking features include the original leaded glass windows, steep pitched roof and
an original blueprint that was found hidden in the framing of the home. The property
has undergone several renovations completed by the current owners. Sam
Humes, who grew up in this home during the 1940’s, will be available to provide
insight into life in “Vallamont” during this time period.

 

The Carriage House
1515 Florence Street

The Carriage House

The Carriage House

Sponsor: McDonald’s Restaurant, Doug and Fran Doherty
Owner: Nan Young
Co-Chairs: Holly Bogart and Ashley Bogart
Florist: Janet’s Floral Creations, Janet Johns
Theme: Horses as Pets
This circa 1878 Carriage House was built to house carriages and horses owned by
renowned Williamsport families Rova, Moltz, Lundy, and Flock. The original estate
house, located on the corner of Grampian and Florence, was burned and since
replaced. In 1980, James Bower restored the carriage house retaining many of the
original features including beams, doors, windows, hayloft and hay drop in the
dining room. Please take note of the stained glass windows depicting “horse and
carriage” with the date of the estate house. These windows were found stashed away
in the property’s garage loft. Be sure to visit the tack shop located behind the home.

 

The Blair/Daniele House
1317 Market Street

The Blair/Daniele House

The Blair/Daniele House

Sponsor: J. B. Gibbons Construction, LLC
Owner: Maria Daniele
Co-Chairs: Rose Daniele Reed
Florist: Nevill’s Flowers, Rosemary Holmes
Theme: Cats as Pets
This Victorian Style “city house,” with its black wrought-iron fence, was built
around 1897 for D. O. Blair as part of the Vallamont planned subdivision, originally
the Packer Farm. Note the wrap around porch with ornate spindles, decorative
bracket trim, scalloped shingles, gables and gray slate roof. This interior features
beautiful hardwood floors, doors, moldings and split single paneled shutters on the
windows. The kitchen has been remodeled with slate floors and artistic cabinetry
while retaining the butler’s pantry. A carriage house still exists behind the home.

 

The Price/Rudasill House
(Smith Rudasill Interiors & Gifts)
706 Market Street

The Price/Rudasill House

The Price/Rudasill House

Sponsor: Ed and Linda Alberts
Owner: Smith Rudasill
Co-Chairs: Nancy Pfeiffer and Janie Matter
Florist: Special Occasion Florals, Karen Ruhl
Theme: Gentlemen’s Dogs
This deceptively modest-sized Federal style home was originally built between 1866 –
1888. In the 1920’s, the home was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Harry Price, owners of the
“New Park Bakery.” During the 1980’s, the home was converted into two apartments and
from 1985 to the present serves as the site of “Smith Rudasill Interiors and Gifts” a decorating
and design firm, as well as home to the owner. The house is characterized by the
symmetrical windows and graceful interior arches. Note the substantial moldings, the
well-proportioned porch on the home’s south side, and the spacious “park-like” setting.

 

The John R. T. Ryan House
151 East Third Street

The John R. T. Ryan House

The John R. T. Ryan House

Sponsor: DiSalvo’s Restaurant
Owner: Matt and Yvonne DiRocco
Co-Chairs: Matt Di Rocco and Michael K. Rempel, Architect
This circa 1886 three-story, French, Second Empire-style house was the home of John R.
T. Ryan and Emeline Tinsman Ryan. Ryan was a very accomplished but somehow forgotten
local lumberman, entrepreneur, and philanthropist. This home is attached to the former
home of Garrett and Margaret Tinsman via an existing second story enclosed walkway.
It features Italian marble fireplaces, plaster ceiling medallions, Victorian arches, and a
three-story stadium shaped stairway. The structure is in pre-restoration condition. Come
hear the fascinating history of this home, its original owners, and how it is being saved
from the wrecking ball. The Artisan’s Holiday Market will be featured in this home.

 

James V. Brown Library
19 East Fourth Street

The James V. Brown Library

The James V. Brown Library

Sponsor: The Sticky Elbow Restaurant
The James V. Brown Library was a gift to the city of Williamsport from James Vanduzee
Brown, a prominent citizen who made his fortune in lumber and grain mills, and
was instrumental in the founding of the Williamsport Municipal Water Authority. The
Library was designed by Edgar V. Seeler, and opened to the public on June 18, 1907.
Entering through the Fourth Street foyer, visitors encounter the marble statues of Ruth
and Beatrice Portinari which were part of Brown’s personal collection. The magnificent
Moltz Rotunda Reading Room is part of the original structure and contains the stained
glass dome skylight and recently installed wrought iron gazebo.

We will be offering a special ‘Puppy Love’ program in the Rotunda from 11 AM – 12 PM
on November 21st. Therapy Dogs from the local chapter of Therapy Dogs International will be
in the Rotunda with a selection of books children can read to the dogs. ‘Puppy Love’ is offered
every month on the second Monday in the Children’s Room of the Welch Family Wing. Here’s a link
to the description of the program http://calendar.jvbrown.edu/home/event/1677/victorian-christmas-pride-and-pedigree-and-puppy-love-program

 

The Historic Genetti Hotel
200 West Fourth Street

The Historic Genetti Hotel

The Historic Genetti Hotel

Sponsor: Mr. Lynn Womer
The Genetti Hotel was originally named The Lycoming Hotel. On the opening day at
noon, June 21, 1922, Edgar Munson, representing the Board of Directors, raised a large
American flag to the flagpole on the roof 192 feet above West Fourth Street. The
Genetti Hotel’s elegant atmosphere has attracted many notable guests. Among the
celebrity guests were Gene Kelly, Rita Hayworth, Carl Sanburg and Bob Dylan. Victorian
Christmas tourists are welcome to walk through the historic hotel lobby and take in
the beautiful Christmas decorations.

 

The Shire Building
214 West Fourth Street

The Shire Building

The Shire Building

Sponsor: Eagle Rock Winery
Owner: The Genetti Hotel
Chair: Kathy Taylor
Theme: American Kennel Club
Throughout the time period between 1873-1991, this building was occupied by shopkeepers
of various types most notably cobblers, hair dressers and jewelers. The
building also had apartments sometimes occupied by the owners of the shops or
other residents. The last business listed, before the Genetti Hotel acquired the building,
was the jeweler C. A. Shire. Today, the building contains luxurious, newly renovated
loft apartments.

 

The Hermance House
405 West Fourth Street

The Hermance House

The Hermance House

Sponsors: Cloud 9, Franco’s, Joanna’s Italian Bakery
Owners: Rick and Sara Mirabito
Co-Chairs: Annie Campbell and Sarah Boyer
This three-story, castle-like stone mansion of Richardsonian and Romanesque architecture
was designed and built in 1885 by Eber Culver for millionaire Albert DuBois
Hermance, founder of the “Hermance Machine Company.” Note the home’s superb
hand-carved doors, staircase and woodwork made of the highest quality lumber by
Giovanni Ferrari. In 1932, the building was converted into 11 apartments. Amazingly,
all of the carvings remain in their original condition.

 

The Peter Herdic Inn
411 West Fourth Street

The Peter Herdic Inn

The Peter Herdic Inn

Sponsor: Citizens & Northern Bank
Owners: Gloria Miele, James Wood and Robert Elion
Chair: Ruth Grieco
Florist: Lady Di’s Floral & Garden Art, Diane Franklin
Theme: The Pet Steward
This majestic brownstone and brick home was built around 1878 for the Ulman
family and was designed by Eber Culver. The Inn illustrates late Victorian influences
and features double doors with a magnificent beveled, leaded-glass opening into an
oak-wainscoted hallway and parlors. Note the stained glass window at the top of the
steps, and rounded panes in the turret. We are open for tour 11:00AM – 4:00PM

 

The Rowley House Museum
707 West Fourth Street

The Rowley House

The Rowley House

Sponsor: Blaise Alexander Family Dealerships
Owner: Preservation Williamsport
Chair: Robert Kane, Rowley House Museum Curator
This circa 1888 three-story brick mansion was designed by Eber Culver for millionaire
Edwin A. Rowley and is one of the most significant Queen Anne Victorian
Houses in Pennsylvania. Only the finest woods were used befitting a residence in the
“lumber capital of the world.” Admire the elaborately carved staircase in the main
entrance hall, the dining room with its built-in buffet, the numerous fireplaces
throughout and Tiffany-quality stained glass windows.

 

YWCA
815 West Fourth Street

The YWCA Rotunda

The YWCA Rotunda

Sponsors: Chef Hosch and Ann Catering, Inc.
The cornerstone for the majestic home of the YWCA Northcentral
PA was laid in 1928, after a dedicated team of women raised $450,000
for construction in a mere five days. The centerpiece of this 70,000 sq. ft. Georgian-
style building is the breath-taking rotunda. Griffins, gold-leaf and vibrant
colors highlight this work of art commissioned and created by Marguerite Bierman.
Take a moment to notice the marble thresholds, hand-carved wooden details
and crystal chandeliers adorning the decor. This year, we have exciting
news! Since the theme is “Pride and Pedigree,” and we have our spacious
rotunda, we have invited the Lycoming County SPCA to have pets available
for adoption in our rotunda for Victorian Christmas!

 

The Thomas T. Taber Museum
Lycoming County Historical Society
858 West Fourth Street

The Thomas T. Taber Museum

The Thomas T. Taber Museum

Sponsor: Shamrock Grill and Subs
Remember the childhood thrill of opening Santa’s gift and discovering your
very own toy train? The one you then placed under the Christmas tree each
year? Visitors to the Taber will be welcomed to the holiday exhibit which will
feature toy trains from private collections, a special tribute to the 25th anniversary
of the Will Huffman Toy Train Exhibit. The trains will be displayed among
the artwork of the talented Bald Eagle Art League Shempp Model Train Collection.
Over three hundred trains, many of them rare examples, are housed here.
Two layouts transform even the most reluctant of visitors into a budding railroad
engineer! All ABOARD!

 

The Munson/Metzger House
870 West Fourth Street

The Munson/Metzger House

The Munson/Metzger House

Sponsor: The Old Corner Restaurant
Owners: Edmund C. and Stacey Metzger
Chair: Cindy Bower
Florist: Gstalder’s Landscaping, Peter Gstalder
Theme: Birds as Pets & SPCA
This home was built circa 1884-1885 for Robert H. and Olivia Munson, who in
1892 sold it to his parents Edgar and Lucy Munson for their retirement home.
The Munson/Metzger House is a fine example of Queen Anne style with multiple
building materials including a brick first floor, ceramic tile on the second
floor, pressed tin style painted ceilings, and beautiful woodwork. In addition,
beveled-lead glass windows set-off the main entrance. The slate roof features
three decorative chimneys with ceramic fish scale tiles adorning the main gable.
The front porch was extensively remodeled in 2007-2009 by Edmund Metzger.

 

Christ Episcopal Church
426 Mulberry Street, 9 AM – 4 PM

Christ Episcopal Church

Christ Episcopal Church

Christ Church is the city’s oldest Episcopal Church. A parish church was organized in 1841 and the first church building was located on the present site of the New Covenant Church. In 1869, the now standing Christ Church was built with its first service held on Christmas Day. This Victorian Norman-Gothic structure is adorned with stained glass windows many of which are Tiffany, and a pipe organ.
Ongoing sanctuary tours and refreshments will be served.

 

First Presbyterian Church
102 East Third Street, 9 AM – 4 PM

First Presbyterian Church

First Presbyterian Church

Built in 1883 at the corner of Mulberry and East Third Street, the First Church of Williamsport (as it was then known) has a rising ceiling vault of 35 feet supporting magnificent bejeweled glass windows, some predating Tiffany Studios of New York. In 1995, local artist Marguerite Bierman brought renewal and vibrancy to the sanctuary’s carvings, columns, brackets and luminous Tiffany Cross. Exhibits of art, needle work and quilts by church members will be displayed.

 

First Baptist Church
380 West Fourth Street, 9 AM – 4 PM

First Baptist Church

First Baptist Church

This landmark church was originally designed and built by Eber Culver in 1854 on land donated by Peter Herdic whose wife was a member of the congregation. After being destroyed by floods, the original building was torn down in 1889. The main sanctuary was completed in 1914. The church is an example of the Romanesque style architecture with mountain stone quarried from this area. The present church is known for its beautiful sanctuary with the eight stained glass windows depicting Baptist patriarchs. The jewel of all the windows faces West Fourth Street and depicts the baptism of Jesus. Designed in London and built in New York City by Young and Bonawitz in 1914, the windows were taken apart to be transported to Williamsport.

The Williamsport Youth Choir will perform from 11 AM – 12 PM in the sanctuary.

Building tours, live music, activities for children, and a food court featuring Alabaster Coffee, Awesome Cupcake and Acme Barbecue & Catering Co. will be available throughout the day.

 

Saint Joseph the Worker Parish
702 West Fourth Street, 10 AM – 3 PM

Saint Joseph the Worker Parish

Saint Joseph the Worker Parish

Built in 1886 by Amos Wagner on land donated by Peter Herdic, the church was built to service the Irish-Catholic community. It is an example of the Romanesque style architecture and the sandstone came from the Ralston Quarry. The church has a multi-gabled slate roof and walls with colored belt courses. There are 43 arched stained glass windows. The entryway and entry doors are semi-circular. The bell tower is open with a decorative cornice and patterned stone. The center tower was capped when three workers fell to their death during construction. The interior has marble altars and Tiffany windows, including “The Accession of Christ” behind the main altar installed in the early 1900s. The church seats 600 people and features an abundance of marble and gold décor. You must see this beautiful church. Sanctuary tours 10 AM – 3 PM.
Adult Choral Performance 3 PM

Lunch, beverages and crafts from 9 AM – 3 PM
Served next door at the Monsignor William J. Fleming Parish Center.

 

Covenant Central Presbyterian Church
807 West Fourth Street, 9 AM – 4 PM

Covenant Central Presbyterian Church

Covenant Central Presbyterian Church

Built in 1909 in the Richardson Romanesque style, this structure is marble and granite including the front steps all of which was quarried at the Avondale Quarry near Philadelphia. The roof is terracotta tile and copper with thick window lintels, large semi-circular arched entries, three doors with stained glass, and many arched, stained glass windows. The church has an eight-sided dome in the sanctuary, which includes a cross on top, made of solid oak with hammered copper overlay.

 

Trinity Episcopal Church
844 West Fourth Street, 9 AM – 4 PM

Trinity Episcopal Church

Trinity Episcopal Church

Built in 1875 by Culver and Thorn, the church was paid for by Peter Herdic who donated not only the land but also the building to Trinity Parish for one dollar as long as the pews remain “forever free.” Peter Herdic’s father-in-law, Judge Maynard, presented the church with the first set of nine-bell Westminster chimes in America, the same type of chimes heard in the Big Ben Tower of London. An example of English Gothic architecture, the church was built with stone quarried locally from Bald Eagle Mountain and brownstone from Hummelstown, PA. Note the pointed arches and windows, steeply pitched colored slate roof, and 265-foot spire. In an 1876 issue of the Parish Dial, the following passage appears describing the church’s windows, “Words cannot paint the loveliness of these windows.” The lead-glass makers Aickin and Isaac of Philadelphia conscientiously adhered to the true idea of glass staining which does not consist of painting the various colors upon large sheets of glass, but in leading separate pieces together so as to present a transparent mosaic. The side windows show exquisite geometrical designs.

A Victorian Soup Lunch featuring 3 varieties of soup, parmesan toast, dessert, and beverage will be served $9.00/person 11 AM – 2 PM.

 


The Committee Wishes to
Pay Special Acknowledgement to:

• The Homeowners who shared their Homes
• The Sponsors
• Photographer – Richard Karp,  rikkisan.com  570.244.7131
• Brochure/Ticket Design – Sandra Norton Butters